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1 Introductory concepts 2  Market mechanism  3 Elasticities  4 Market structures 5  Market failures  6  Macro economic activity/eco growth  7 Inflation 8  Employment & unemployment  9  External Stability  10  Income distribution 11.Factors affecting economy  12  Fiscal/Budgetary policy  13  Monetary Policy   14 Aggregate Supply Policies  15 The Policy Mix

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Direct action plan


The current Government’s Direct Action Plan is designed to source low cost emissions reductions without resorting to a price on carbon via either an ETS or a carbon tax.  It essentially involves the government providing financial incentives for businesses to reduce Co2 levels, such as subsidies to develop more efficient pollution abatement technology or tax concessions to investment in reneable energies.   


Other direct action measures include a number of programs or packages designed to change business behavior towards more efficient energy usage (such as the Clean Technology Program and the Steel Transformation Plan).  In addition, there are numerous direct action measures designed to achieve greater efficiency of energy usage by households and businesses, including continued support for households installing renewable energy systems, such as solar electricity as well as carbon farming initiatives that involve projects designed for carbon abatement and the earning of marketable carbon credits.


The former government's Renewable Energy Target (RET) was for 20% of Australia's energy requirement coming from renewable sources by 2020.   To complement the policy to price carbon, the government continued to invest heavily in renewable energy.  In recent budgets for example, the government committed funds for the Renewable Energy Future Fund, which was designed to promote renewable energy projects such as wind, solar and biomass.  This forms part of the government's expanded Clean Energy Initiative, which also includes the Solar Flagships program and the Carbon Capture and Storage Flagships program.  In addition, the government invested money in a number of funds (such as the Biodiversity Fund and the Energy Security Fund) designed to both assist and facilitate the move to a low carbon future.   


 1 Introductory concepts 2  Market mechanism  3 Elasticities  4 Market structures 5  Market failures  6  Macro economic activity/eco growth  7 Inflation 8  Employment & unemployment  9  External Stability  10  Income distribution 11  Fiscal/Budgetary policy  12  Monetary Policy  13 Aggregate Supply Policies  14 The Policy Mix

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